This Week’s Links (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Channel 4 Facebook Documentary

Shut Your Facebook is a new documentary series regarding how to repair your online social media profile when looking for work or staying in your job, or just generally wanting to keep your private life out of the public view, which is an important consideration for survivors.

It will be available at Channel 4′s catchup site 4oD until around 6th May but UK users only have to register to watch it after that.

http://www.channel4.com/programmes/4od/catchup’

Please note that this programme aired late in the evening in the UK and carries a warning about sexual content and nudity.

 

This Week’s Links (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

BBC LA Stories Episode on Sex Offenders

If you’re in the UK you can catch an episode of Louis Theroux LA Stories titled “Among the Sex Offenders”.

Documentary. Louis Theroux spends time in the twilight world of Los Angeles’ paroled sex offenders, who live under force of tough regulations

As a non UK resident I cannot watch it but if you happen to catch it we’d love to hear your opinions on it. It’ll only be available online for a couple of days if you’re interested.

This Week’s Links (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Cinderella Law Aims to Criminalize Emotional Abuse

That’s the news out of the UK this week, but it is not without it’s detractors.

Frankly, I’m not exactly sure it shouldn’t have detractors. What I continue to fall back on is this quote in the first link.

‘We need a clear, concise and workable definition of child maltreatment — an alternative code that reflects the range of harm of done to children and which provides appropriate legal mechanisms to tackle some of the worst cases.

That I can totally agree with. We should be able to protect children who are being severely emotionally abused whether there is proof of physical abuse or not. The question is, does this law give the UK a clear and concise definition of child maltreatment, or a loosely defined idea of maltreatment that is left up to law enforcement to figure out, and courts to discern who is actually guilty of it? That I can’t get behind. That becomes a law that could be used to simply terrorize parents and needlessly entangle the legal system into the every day lives of families. That’s not going to be good for children.

Hopefully, they do come up with something clear, and workable.

This Week’s Links (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

British Experiment Shows Cost of Pedophile Fears

The experiment was a simple one. Take two small girls and put them, apparently, by themselves in a large shopping area, looking lost and confused, and see who stops to help them.

The results left the experimenters stunned, but I don’t know why they would be. We have absolutely reached a point where showing interest at all in any child that is not directly related to you, especially for men, is an open invitation to being accused of being a pedophile. And despite the NSPCC’s message that we should be thinking of the children, and not our own reputation, it’s not as simple as all that. If I were accused of being a pedophile, it would pretty much be the end of life as I know it. I would no longer have a job, and it would be near impossible to get hired anywhere, even without being found guilty, and if I was found guilty of any crime at all related to that kid, I would face a lifetime of being registered as a sex offender.

Do you really want to run the risk of having your name and face splashed all over the media as an accused child snatcher? Do you think, even if you are found not guilty, that public opinion won’t already be against you? Why do you think the number of male teachers has dropped to almost nothing? Or that other people who work with children as volunteers, or coaches, are only the ones with kids in the program? If I, as a childless male, wanted to coach a youth sports team, do you think anyone would actually let me do that? If they did, I’d face suspicion every single day of my life. I don’t need that.

No thanks. I’ll look for the police, or I’ll just have to hope that someone else, like the elderly lady who wouldn’t have the same accusations thrown at her, will help them. I’m not about to stop and approach those little girls.

This Week’s Links (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Depression From a Spouse’s Point of View

Anne Wheaton, yes Wil’s wife, has written an insightful piece about dealing with a loved one’s depression. What I like about it is the honesty she shows in talking about what chemical depression can look like to a spouse. It doesn’t often look like depression, it looks like anger and frustration, etc. Depression symptoms are not always about sitting in bed and looking sad, they can show themselves in many ways, including anger, an avoidance of every day, common activities, even a loss of interest with things that once were a big part of our lives.

Thanks Anne, and Wil for sharing your story, and for showing those suffering from depression that there is hope and help out there!