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Hi, I’m Mike McBride. I am a survivor of childhood abuse. I am also a survivor of major depression, dissociative fugue and a suicide attempt. This is my place. This is where I share my thoughts, my knowledge, and educational resources about all of these topics, in multiple ways. I don’t do this for fame, and I’m definitely not making any money from it. I do it so that the next survivor, of any of these things, has at least one place on the world wide web to know that they are not alone.

You are, in fact, not alone. Far from it, and I hope that by looking around here, and maybe even subscribing, you will learn this simple fact, and draw strength from it. If you know anyone who might benefit from that, please share this with them.

If you are a social media user, I hope you’ll consider following this little website using the links in the sidebar or at the top of the page, and if you’re interested in technology, or photography, I hope you’ll click over and follow my work on other pages as well!


Latest Posts from the Blogs


  • It doesn't have to be a grand purpose either, just something that makes you want to return each day. It can be wanting to learn something new, be there for the important days for a friend or family member, see what happens with Taylor Swift and Travis Kelce, or whatever makes you want to get up the next day to be part of it. That moves us to healing, showing up for our lives each day. That, to me, is purpose. […]
  • ? The post Shared Links (weekly) May 12, 2024 appeared first on Survivors News and Reviews.
  • I'm going to consider this as I write going forward. Not that I'll suddenly become the source of toxic positivity, but I will think more about hope, healing, and growth because as hard as many things are, there is hope. We should remind people of that. If you plan to talk about mental health topics, take a look at the research. The post Sharing – Wording On Social Media Can Influence Views On Mental Health appeared first on Survivors News and […]
  • ? The post Shared Links (weekly) May 5, 2024 appeared first on Survivors News and Reviews.
  • I'm linking to this not because I think we should all give up on finding a better balance between screen time and in-person time but because I want to remind all of us that simply taking away screens from someone struggling or kids is possibly taking away a lifeline, too. There are dangerous things out here on the internet, but there are also a lot of good, positive experiences. The post Sharing – Screen Time Shenanigans For Your Mental Health appeared […]
  • Seeking to improve ourselves to catch up on some deficiencies that we believe we have will be a neverending proposition. It will lead to misery because it starts with feeling inferior. You're not. Now, go better yourself because you want to be better. Not because you have to catch up. The post When Self-Improvement Turns Into Misery appeared first on Survivors News and Reviews.
  • I have often said the best defense against childhood sexual abuse is raising kids who have open, supportive, adults in their lives because they aren't as vulnerable and easily manipulated. It turns out those same relationships are improving their mental well-being too. Let's do more of that. The post Sharing – Positive Childhood Experiences Protect Against Depression in Teens appeared first on Survivors News and Reviews.
  • Haven't we been talking over and over again about the lack of human connection and the impacts on our mental health? Maybe if we spent a little more time complimenting each other when a job is well done, or on a new look, or a trait that we admire, we'd have more human connection in our days. The post Sharing – Giving and Receiving Compliments appeared first on Survivors News and Reviews.

  • If you were burned out, overworked, and struggling to keep up with the demands of the job, and a tool promised to save you 30 minutes or more to get your work done, you'd figure out how to use it, too. Of course, most of them are trying to use these tools without training and instruction from the company, so this is risky. One, because you have no idea what they are doing and what results they're getting. Two, they might become even more burned out trying to teach themselves before they get to the part […]
  • What I would like, however, is just once for someone not to feel the need to make a business case for treating your employees with kindness and empathy. This need to include the business case and the impact on the bottom line is an appeal to management in their self-interest and the financial interest of their business. How about we make the case that being kind, thoughtful, and empathetic towards employees is the right way to treat a fellow human being, regardless of what it means for the bottom line? Is it too much to ask […]
  • When management harms the mental health of our employees, we typically respond by offering them yoga or meditation spaces or maybe a lunchtime session on stress management. We never look at the system. We offer them ways to better cope with the broken system, but we never take responsibility for what the workplace is doing to their mental health. The post Linked – Mental Health at Work: Managers and Money appeared first on Mike McBride Online. If you want to see more like this, consider subscribing to the RSS Feed.
  • Every person you lay off from your business is ten times more likely to try and take their own life. I don't think senior executives think in those terms. I suspect many are thinking about juicing the bottom line, getting a little stock price bump, maybe making things more efficient, etc. I think large investors think about what is best for their stock values. That's why CEOs announce layoffs of 10% of the workforce and are rewarded with $100 million bonuses. The post We should be honest about the mental health impacts of layoffs appeared first […]
  • When you're young and not on the standard education/career path due to mental health, there's no career history or learned skills to fall back on. I think many employers would view you as unemployable in our current environment. I'm not saying that should be how it is, but it is likely the way it is. My story illustrates the path out of that, but it also contains some privilege. I was able to go to therapy. My family gave me a place to live while I wasn't working. I had access to learning tools. I had […]
  • Working from home opens up opportunities to people who can't, for many reasons, travel to an office every day. It can, however, be lonely at times. Finding the right balance is key. Finding the places where you can still connect with people outside of work is key. You're no longer spending a third of your day in the same location as your coworkers and connecting by default. Still, you can connect and be more involved in your community because you're not spending another couple of hours commuting. You can spend more time with your family. You […]