Connection Matters – An Example
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Connection Matters – An Example

As I read this, I couldn’t help but compare it to the hundreds of stories where the opposite was true. People are so afraid of saying the wrong thing or so uncomfortable with the idea of mental health issues that they run the other way. They disconnect from someone who so desperately needs connection. Someone they love is feeling all that embarrassment and pain and no longer has anyone to connect to and remind them of their value, their humanness.

As the title of Elizabeth’s post says, we need each other.

Some Reality About Loving a Survivor

Some Reality About Loving a Survivor

It is true. As much as you might love your partner and want to support them, there are ripple effects that impact well beyond the individual survivor. Those ripple effects are painful, and we can acknowledge that pain without diminishing the pain of being the direct victim. All of it sucks, and all of it is the fault of the abuser.

There’s no one else to blame, just a lot of people left to struggle. Let’s do what we can to support all of them.

Sharing – ‘My Husband Was Hospitalized, I Didn’t Tell People Why’
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Sharing – ‘My Husband Was Hospitalized, I Didn’t Tell People Why’

Imagine your spouse going into a hospital for surgery or an injury and having no help navigating that, and also trying to take care of a 12-year-old daughter without anyone else there to take care of a meal or two or transport your kid to school and other events. That’s the reality Amy, and many other families, find themselves in because we still live in a world where we aren’t supposed to admit to having mental health issues and where those are the kinds of secrets you keep within the immediate family only.

Good News – People Probably Like You More Than You Think They Do

Good News – People Probably Like You More Than You Think They Do

The bad news, however, might be that almost everyone does this. So instead of connecting with each other, we are each stressing over all the things we may have done wrong when we interacted. Which isn’t great. That makes it harder to connect with other people, which has a ton of negative effects on our mental health.

Childhood Trauma and ACE Scores in the News Again

Childhood Trauma and ACE Scores in the News Again

I think that makes sense. This is consistent with previous studies. What I want to know about, though, are the 45% who don’t have depression, the 49% who don’t have anxiety, the 75% without PTSD, and the 80% with no substance abuse issues. What was different for them? What kind of help or support was available for them as children compared to the others who did suffer from these issues? What kind of trauma were they dealing with? What kind of community did they live in? What resources were made available for them?

Do You Fear Happiness?

Do You Fear Happiness?

How often, as children, did we decide to “fly under the radar” and not draw attention to something that brought us happiness because that just created a target? How many of us, as adults, still live with the fear that identifying something that makes us happy only invites someone to hurt us by taking it away? Even when there is no one there to take it, we live with that fear and don’t get too attached to anything.

My hope for all of us is to find a safe place to overcome that and enjoy the things that make us happy.