Blaming Social Media for Mental Health Issues is a Cop Out to Avoid Harder Decisions

Blaming Social Media for Mental Health Issues is a Cop Out to Avoid Harder Decisions

What I read in this matches what I see in real life. Some people spend a lot of time on social media doing things that are bad for their mental health. (Comparing their lives to the ultra-filtered images they see on social media, filling their feed with information that is bad for their mental health, etc.) while others use social media to connect with an online support network.

Given that, the calls for banning social media use for kids seem odd, but they are based on that being the easy thing. Blaming big tech will never be unpopular, and there is a possibility that some people might be better off not using social media as much.

40% of Americans are Covered by Medicare or Medicaid and Struggle to Access Mental Healthcare

40% of Americans are Covered by Medicare or Medicaid and Struggle to Access Mental Healthcare

We talk a lot in the advocate community about not being alone with mental health issues. I try to encourage anyone to see others who are dealing with the same issues around mental health and childhood abuse and recognize that they are not in this alone. There are many of us out here dealing with the same thing.  Many in the US and other countries are alone in accessing care. That should shame us all. 

Sharing – Are Adult Survivors of Child Abuse Ever Fully Healed?

Sharing – Are Adult Survivors of Child Abuse Ever Fully Healed?

This is why I look for the definition when I read anything about being fully healed. What does being healed mean to you? Is your definition possible? A definition that includes the abuse having zero impact on who you are today? Because that’s not realistic. But it also doesn’t mean you can’t go on to have a healed life while acknowledging that it is still part of who you are.

It was a traumatic event; they became part of us. They don’t have to rule us, though. That’s healed.

The Benefits of Positive Childhood Experiences (PCEs)

The Benefits of Positive Childhood Experiences (PCEs)

What do we have to offer those kids beyond a message about how their already-high ACE score likely means they have a lifetime of poor outcomes to look forward to? It turns out we have a lot to offer them. By creating positive experiences, we can start to undo the damage and create a preventative buffer to help avoid further adverse events. 

Are Active Shooter Drills Harming Kids Mental Health?

Are Active Shooter Drills Harming Kids Mental Health?

But what is the least harmful way to deal with that? What is the least harmful way to inform kids of the wars in Ukraine and Gaza? What is the least harmful way to prepare kids for the natural disasters that seem only to get worse each year?

I don’t know. What I do know is that dealing with all of this is hard and only part of the causes of increased needs for youth mental health. Our current mental health system failed many people for years when the need wasn’t this high. What we are doing isn’t working. Continuing to do the same thing won’t work. Fighting against increased funding and availability of resources won’t work. Hiding our heads in the sand and saying, “not my kid,” won’t work. This is a society-wide problem that will require societal change. I am not sure we are willing to make those changes, but an entire generation of kids will pay the price for that unwillingness.