Sharing – Prison is no place for people with mental illnesses. I know because I was in one
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Sharing – Prison is no place for people with mental illnesses. I know because I was in one

There is a direct link between the growing prison population and the lack of mental health resources. The only difference is that we can scare people into paying to build more prisons and keep “dangerous people” away from us. It’s much harder to convince people to invest in prevention through mental health treatment, even if that would be much more effective in protecting everyone.

Youth Mental Health – A Crisis, but Ending Pandemic Rules Won’t End the Crisis

Youth Mental Health – A Crisis, but Ending Pandemic Rules Won’t End the Crisis

There’s been a lot of talk about youth mental health during the pandemic, including a number of prominent voices raising the alarm about this crisis. There have been almost as many voices suggesting that ending things like lockdowns, mask and vaccine mandates, and just getting “back to normal” will fix this mental health crisis.

I am not one of those voices.

Now let me be clear, I’m not saying that the pandemic hasn’t played a number on mental health for all of us, it clearly has. But, the crisis in mental health for everyone, but especially young people, existed long before COVID-19.

Why do we get Stressed About Replying Quickly?

Why do we get Stressed About Replying Quickly?

My first thought, obviously, was about the workplace and the culture we have created there that rewards being “always-on” but I think so much of this pressure permeates beyond work. As technology has become commonplace we all live with this pressure and this expectation. Think about it, how many times in a given week are you apologizing to friends and family because you couldn’t get back to them right away?

I do it all the time.

Heck, I’ve gotten text messages while having lunch or dinner with a friend, catching up with someone I haven’t gotten to see much for the last couple of years, and then apologized for doing that and being unavailable. Why? That makes no sense but we live in a culture where being connected to technology all the time also means that we should be responsive all the time. Or at least we feel like we should. Frankly, that’s a lot of pressure.

Study Shows That Limiting Your Life to Only “Positive” Friends May Be Hurting You
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Study Shows That Limiting Your Life to Only “Positive” Friends May Be Hurting You

As it turns out, tuning out people who might need some compassion is simply an act of isolation, and isolation is almost never good for our own mental health. By cutting out the people who don’t always offer up those positive vibes, we wind up disconnected and lonely. Which, of course, we can’t share with the people left around us, because we are all living in the nothing negative bubble, so you are now living a very isolated life, which leads to much MORE anxiety, stress, and depression. 

Sharing – The impact of Facebook and Instagram on teens isn’t so clear
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Sharing – The impact of Facebook and Instagram on teens isn’t so clear

In the end, here’s the thing. You, and your kids, are not a study. You are all individuals, who may be negatively impacted by social media, or not. You may need to consider not using it, you may need to consider changing up who you’re following to get stuff that is good for your mental health into your feeds, or you may be perfectly fine using it the way you are. It might even be helping you and having a positive impact on your lives.

Only you can truly judge that. If it’s harming you, I hope you’ll consider making changes. Follow the social media accounts for this blog if you want to start getting more information like this, or just stop using it altogether. If it’s helping you feel supported and less alone in the world, then enjoy that and I hope you’ll continue to share that within your social media circles.

As I have said many times – do what works for you.