Reviews Elsewhere – 10 Mental Health Books For Middle School Kids

Reviews Elsewhere – 10 Mental Health Books For Middle School Kids

Middle School can be a trying time for kids. They are getting older but aren’t teenagers yet. They are going through changes and dealing with big issues without much experience dealing with emotions. Luckily, Sarah Zellner offers up these suggestions for books about mental health targeted at this age range.

Reviews Elsewhere – Addiction: Notes From the Belly of the Beast

Reviews Elsewhere – Addiction: Notes From the Belly of the Beast

This brief review from Canada piqued my interest because while we tend to read a lot about addiction, one of the points of view we don’t get enough is from the addict.

From their book description, I thought it might interest the many readers who struggle with addictions themselves or know someone who is dealing with them now.

Reviews Elsewhere – The Best Wellness Books For Your Mind, Body, and Spirit

Reviews Elsewhere – The Best Wellness Books For Your Mind, Body, and Spirit

I found this over on the Esquire site and thought that some of these titles dedicated to meditation, anxiety, breathing techniques, setting boundaries, etc., might be of interest to my readers as well.

Granted, some of them might not be your cup of tea, and some of the titles are a little off-putting to me, but as I’ve said, whatever works for you. So check it out, and let us know if you’ve read any of these and found them especially useful.

Reviews Elsewhere – The Strange & Curious Guide to Trauma by Sally Donovan

Reviews Elsewhere – The Strange & Curious Guide to Trauma by Sally Donovan

I came across this review when someone shared it on social media, and it got picked up and passed around a bit. The review is from the Foster Talk page, which is aimed at Foster families and intersects the topics here when we talk about childhood trauma. Ruth Willets shared this about the book, which might be of interest to many of you who have teens and kids who have experienced trauma, or maybe even some young adults who could use some help understanding what trauma does to us.

Reviews Elsewhere – The Grieving Brain: The Surprising Science of How we Learn from Love and Loss.

Reviews Elsewhere – The Grieving Brain: The Surprising Science of How we Learn from Love and Loss.

Losing a spouse, parent, sibling, etc. for me would be different than losing one of my friends. I love them differently, and I imagine I would grieve differently.. Losing anyone you love hurts but you likely have a variety of different relationships with people so it only makes sense that you would grieve them differently too, and then it also becomes obvious that we all will grieve differently from each other. There’s no straight line, there’s no “normal” way to grieve, there is just one individual processing the loss of another person that they had a unique connection to.

Wherever you are in that process is where you are. It’s not a contest and it’s not a pre-defined timeline. It’s a loss and you are free to mourn that.