Sharing – the challenge of normalising

Sharing – the challenge of normalising

For many of us, child abuse was normal. Not because there is anything remotely acceptable about it, but because it happened to us. Turning away from our stories and ignoring our voices because you don’t want to think about it isn’t good enough.

We don’t have that choice. We deserve more than being kept silent in order for you not to be upset by our realities.

Sharing – Patrice Evra: Ex-Manchester United star wants to end violence against children and details his own experience of sexual abuse
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Sharing – Patrice Evra: Ex-Manchester United star wants to end violence against children and details his own experience of sexual abuse

How many times have we heard “why did you wait so long to speak out?” Have we considered what we’ve done to make survivors feel safe to do so? Have we considered what our friend or family group would need to look like in order for a survivor to feel safe opening up about their experiences?

Shared Links (weekly) June 26, 2022

Shared Links (weekly) June 26, 2022

Shared Links (weekly) June 19, 2022

Shared Links (weekly) June 19, 2022

Shared Links (weekly) June 5, 2022

Shared Links (weekly) June 5, 2022

Sharing – Man who suffered child sex abuse now helps other survivors speak out

Sharing – Man who suffered child sex abuse now helps other survivors speak out

For Jeremy, the abuse stopped, and then he went on with life seemingly without issue. Until later, when there was an issue. We assume that all survivors keep their secrets because they are ashamed, and many of us do. But there are also survivors who don’t “look” like abuse survivors, they go on with a relatively normal and successful life, until one day they don’t. Someone who looks like your abuser, a different overwhelmingly stressful situation, an inadvertent touch, or a smell, can all bring it rushing back into your consciousness.

This is another reason why people don’t tell until much later. They don’t really have a reason to, they seem to be “over it”, but they aren’t always really over it.

This is yet another example of survivors being unique individuals and the fact that how each of us is impacted can be different too. Just because another survivor has a different journey than you, doesn’t mean much in the end.