Sharing – Screen Time Shenanigans For Your Mental Health

Sharing – Screen Time Shenanigans For Your Mental Health

I’m linking to this not because I think we should all give up on finding a better balance between screen time and in-person time but because I want to remind all of us that simply taking away screens from someone struggling or kids is possibly taking away a lifeline, too. There are dangerous things out here on the internet, but there are also a lot of good, positive experiences.

Mental Health and Elections

Mental Health and Elections

We have to address societal issues that cause harm. Politicians who don’t address both the lack of mental health resources and the various political issues that actively harm the mental health of all of us don’t deserve our vote. If you consider yourself a mental health advocate, consider how your representatives have voted and where they stand on these issues. Have they cut mental health funding, opposed mental health support in schools, or supported laws that cause active mental harm to some segments of the population?

Consider that before you go to the voting booth this year.

Online Education – Not Just for Tech and Career Skills

Online Education – Not Just for Tech and Career Skills

I’ll admit it, if you asked me where online you could educate yourself about Mental Health and self-care, LinkedIn Learning and Coursera wouldn’t have been at the top of my mind. Thankfully, the Make Use Of website knows better. They’ve shared some recommendations on courses you can take online:

What is Sextortion and Why Are Kids Getting Caught Up in This?

What is Sextortion and Why Are Kids Getting Caught Up in This?

We know where the story goes from there, but if you have kids who spend any time online, you may want to give it a read and dig deeper into some of the linked resources they’ve created for parents. There’s some good information about what to look for and how to teach kids to be more aware.

Don’t just assume this won’t happen to your kid.

Another Tool in Abuse Prevention – Community

Another Tool in Abuse Prevention – Community

This is where the community comes in. Kids with strong connections to safe adults are less likely to be targeted and more likely to tell if they are. LGBTQ kids are less likely to struggle with suicidal ideation when they have adults who accept them as they are. Kids dealing with anxiety and depression have better outcomes when they have safe adults to talk through their emotions with, who can support them through difficult times. I’ve talked endlessly about the need for strong relationships with parents as the best preventive medicine we have for keeping children safe and supported. I’ve also talked, on my other site, about the importance of work-life balance and inclusivity when it comes to the workplace for parents. That’s what being the community that families need to succeed includes.