Reviews Elsewhere – 10 Mental Health Books For Middle School Kids

Reviews Elsewhere – 10 Mental Health Books For Middle School Kids

Middle School can be a trying time for kids. They are getting older but aren’t teenagers yet. They are going through changes and dealing with big issues without much experience dealing with emotions. Luckily, Sarah Zellner offers up these suggestions for books about mental health targeted at this age range.

Sharing – I’m a psychologist – and I believe we’ve been told devastating lies about mental health

Sharing – I’m a psychologist – and I believe we’ve been told devastating lies about mental health

Of course, he’s right. What he sees in the UK is the same thing I see from my “much less qualified but simply paying attention” seat in the US, and I’m sure many of you see where you live as well. Our current mental health resources are designed to help “fix” something wrong with us. I can’t say they even do that well, but at least that is the plan, and that plan makes sense for many mental health struggles.

It is only part of the picture, though. In all seriousness, how would the 6-8 therapist sessions a good insurance plan covers help someone escaping domestic abuse or trying to feed a family on a minimum wage job? How is the teenager being abused at home, bullied at school, and overwhelmed by the bleakness of what the world might look like when they are an adult supposed to find hope in one crisis text line conversation?

How will we provide hope and connection to people without first understanding their world and how they navigate it every day?

The Daily Podcast Takes on Adolescent Mental Health
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The Daily Podcast Takes on Adolescent Mental Health

I found it interesting because I think the show does a good job of talking to people involved with treating kids and showing what the problem is. Starting with the conversation with a pediatrician, we learn that medical schools don’t effectively train doctors to deal with mental health issues. The risks to children they’ve been taught to deal with are external. These include viruses, broken bones from accidents, stitching cuts, etc. Today, however, the risks to kids have become much more internal. They are harming themselves due to mental health issues at rates we’ve never seen before. Doctors have not been trained to deal with those kinds of risks, and it is made clear that if you’re studying to be a pediatrician, you focus on the external risks because if a kid comes in with an internal risk, you’ll refer them to someone who specializes in mental health.

Of course, there’s a problem with that.

Shared Links (weekly) Sept. 4, 2022

Shared Links (weekly) Sept. 4, 2022

Shared Links (weekly) Aug. 28, 2022

Shared Links (weekly) Aug. 28, 2022