Sharing – Small Talk With A Stranger Can Still Save Lives, Says Samaritans

Sharing – Small Talk With A Stranger Can Still Save Lives, Says Samaritans

I’ve talked about this a little bit, but maybe not in detail. When I was really struggling, I can’t necessarily say that someone starting a conversation with me made the difference that day. I don’t think I was self-aware enough to know that. What I do know, however, is that being seen makes a huge difference. In my depression, I did not want to be seen. I wanted to fade away. That was the driver behind my desire, to simply not be here. To disconnect from everything in order to disconnect from the pain I was in. Small connections helped me understand what I was giving up, and why I might want to rethink that.

Shared Links (weekly) July 11, 2021

Shared Links (weekly) July 11, 2021

Have We Overlooked Men When Talking About Body Shaming?

Have We Overlooked Men When Talking About Body Shaming?

I’ve been lucky enough to see a couple of men talk about eating disorders, and body image, but I’ll be the first to admit, if you asked me, based on what I see and hear, if these were mostly women’s issues, I’d probably say yes. But that’s wrong. These are very much men’s issues and trans issues as well. We make jokes about dad bods and assume it’s no big deal because it’s men, and they don’t have the same problems, and hang ups, but we do. There are far more people in the world struggling with their body, and disordered eating, who aren’t included in the conversation because we assume it’s a young women’s issue. 

Sharing – Is it really OK to not be OK?

Sharing – Is it really OK to not be OK?

The article below is about the UK, where NHS funding determines how much mental health treatment is available, and when too many people need it, someone has to decide who does, and doesn’t. Usually that means people who aren’t “sick enough”, get nothing, and continue to get worse.

Can we say the same isn’t true in other countries? In the US, we have a severe shortage of mental health resources and funding too. Maybe there’s not a government agency determining who is “sick enough”, but there are plenty of obstacles to getting care that leave you with similar results. You’re not sick enough to be a priority, you’re not insured enough to get treatment, you’re not wealthy enough to get private care, and on and on.