Sharing – Wording On Social Media Can Influence Views On Mental Health

Sharing – Wording On Social Media Can Influence Views On Mental Health

I’m going to consider this as I write going forward. Not that I’ll suddenly become the source of toxic positivity, but I will think more about hope, healing, and growth because as hard as many things are, there is hope. We should remind people of that.

If you plan to talk about mental health topics, take a look at the research.

Blaming Social Media for Mental Health Issues is a Cop Out to Avoid Harder Decisions

Blaming Social Media for Mental Health Issues is a Cop Out to Avoid Harder Decisions

What I read in this matches what I see in real life. Some people spend a lot of time on social media doing things that are bad for their mental health. (Comparing their lives to the ultra-filtered images they see on social media, filling their feed with information that is bad for their mental health, etc.) while others use social media to connect with an online support network.

Given that, the calls for banning social media use for kids seem odd, but they are based on that being the easy thing. Blaming big tech will never be unpopular, and there is a possibility that some people might be better off not using social media as much.

The Benefits of Positive Childhood Experiences (PCEs)

The Benefits of Positive Childhood Experiences (PCEs)

What do we have to offer those kids beyond a message about how their already-high ACE score likely means they have a lifetime of poor outcomes to look forward to? It turns out we have a lot to offer them. By creating positive experiences, we can start to undo the damage and create a preventative buffer to help avoid further adverse events. 

Sharing – 71% of UK men have experienced some form of sexual victimization by a woman
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Sharing – 71% of UK men have experienced some form of sexual victimization by a woman

But then I got to thinking. I’ve talked about being a sexual abuse survivor and how it was a male who abused me. What I haven’t talked about and haven’t considered for myself because the incidents are overshadowed by the years of sexual abuse are the occasions when I was sexually victimized without my consent by women.

The Positive Impacts of Social Media

The Positive Impacts of Social Media

This is the world we live in. Not one where teens would be fine if only they didn’t have social media, but one where teens take to social media to get information about mental health and other issues that they can’t talk to anyone else about. Getting rid of social media for minors will leave a void similar to the one I had growing up, where no one I knew talked about abuse or mental health issues, so I assumed I was the only one dealing with it.

That’s not a better world. I think a world where minors can access information provided by advocates who educate themselves about the facts and share their own lived experiences is invaluable. That’s what following these accounts can provide.

I Need You To Go Read This Collection of Research about Teens and Social Media

I Need You To Go Read This Collection of Research about Teens and Social Media

More importantly, for those of us trying to advocate for mental health, we need to realize that there is no simple answer. Turning off all of social media is not going to cure the mental health crisis. It won’t change everything that is going on in all of our lives and across the world. Pretending that we’d all have much better mental health if we just killed off Instagram or TikTik isn’t going to make the county’s mental health problems go away.

So why aren’t we discussing the harder problems that have some proven research to show the negative effects on children’s lives? School shootings, violence, racism, oppression of LGTBQ and minorities, poverty, lack of access to mental health care, etc.