Sharing – What Do I Do When Mental Health Coping Strategies Don’t Work?

Sharing – What Do I Do When Mental Health Coping Strategies Don’t Work?

Sometimes our coping strategies need to adjust to these new realities. That doesn’t mean you are failing, it means you need to adapt. It’s no different than what I often encounter at work, where the technology we work with and assist clients with changes and evolves, and we need to change and evolve with it. What we did yesterday isn’t going to work in today’s reality.

The same is true for our mental health toolkit. We need to keep evolving with it to adapt to changes.

Shared Links (weekly) May 8, 2022

Shared Links (weekly) May 8, 2022

Sharing – Sexual abuse: Why young males are often invisible victims

Sharing – Sexual abuse: Why young males are often invisible victims

I grew up in a world where having my friends and other parents think I was gay seemed worse than just continuing to be abused. Think about that for a minute. Think about what we tell boys about being a man and how society reacts to men who share that they were sexually abused as a child? Is there anything about it that screams “Tell your story. We support you!”.

There are some small pockets of that online and in certain circles, but it’s going to also come with a lot of questions about why you didn’t fight, how you’re destined to now be an abuser, that you enjoyed it, etc.

Female victims of almost all ages will get asked about what they were wearing, how much they drank, etc. That’s wrong.

Male victims will get our own set of questions, mostly about why we didn’t fight, why we were so weak, are we gay? That’s equally as wrong.

Sharing – Depression in Kids: All You Need to Know

Sharing – Depression in Kids: All You Need to Know

Getting kids help as early as possible gives them a much better chance to have less depression and fewer effects as adults. Imagine how many people might have been able to develop mentally healthy strategies instead of devolving into worse conditions if it was common for kids to have access to mental health resources?

Please, don’t ignore signs of depression and mental health struggles in kids. Yes, they can be resilient, but the research clearly shows that they aren’t as resilient as we think they are, and waiting to get access to help is doing more damage.

In this case, it is better to be safe. The worst thing that happens is a kid gets some time to talk to a therapist who determines that it’s not depression but something else. This is not a bad thing, even if the stigma surrounding it says it is.