Blaming Social Media for Mental Health Issues is a Cop Out to Avoid Harder Decisions

Blaming Social Media for Mental Health Issues is a Cop Out to Avoid Harder Decisions

What I read in this matches what I see in real life. Some people spend a lot of time on social media doing things that are bad for their mental health. (Comparing their lives to the ultra-filtered images they see on social media, filling their feed with information that is bad for their mental health, etc.) while others use social media to connect with an online support network.

Given that, the calls for banning social media use for kids seem odd, but they are based on that being the easy thing. Blaming big tech will never be unpopular, and there is a possibility that some people might be better off not using social media as much.

Taylor Swift, Deepfake Porn and the Law

Taylor Swift, Deepfake Porn and the Law

As the article explains, there is no federal law against this in the US. There are some state laws, but they’re not very effective. The problem is that we’ve always treated sexual abuse materials as criminal because, as the saying goes, behind every photo is a child being abused. With deepfakes, though, the abuse isn’t happening. So when a teen girl is the subject of deepfake porn, she was never sexually assaulted, so there’s no crime.

There’s a lot of harm, though. In the case of a celebrity, it might be reputational harm. In the case of teenagers, that fake can turn into blackmail, bullying, and all the mental health issues that go along with that. (The same is true of adults, but we know how vulnerable teens are to this and how this too often ends.)

Sharing – Study leaves little doubt: Depression is linked to high body heat
|

Sharing – Study leaves little doubt: Depression is linked to high body heat

There may not be a simple solution, like the suggested sauna or hot tub, but what I think this study shows is that there is very clearly something going on physically with depression. This is not an “it’s all in your head” situation, and I hope that perhaps information like this, which shows a measured physical symptom tied to depression, gets us to consider depression as something similar to other physical ailments.

Have You Used a Mental Health App Successfully?

Have You Used a Mental Health App Successfully?

So, dear readers. rather than assuming mental health apps don’t work because I haven’t done a good job of using them and letting them help me, let’s have a conversation about what mental health apps have, or haven’t, worked for you, and why. I’m curious to know what the crowd has to say, and what advice you would give others.