Megan’s Law is bad law

posted in: Newsworthy 1 |
Reading Time: 1 minute

As if these sorts of stories weren’t completely predictable, it seems that yet again someone listed on an offender registry has been the victim of vigilante justice in Sacramento.

Years ago, when every child protection agency in the country was pushing for these laws I though they were a bad idea, and I still do. The net effect of laws like this are two-fold, one we see right in this story. People listed in the registry, for whatever reason, are going to be the victims of violent crimes. The second, is that a whole generation of parents and politicians are going to convince themselves that they know where are the dangers for their kids are, because they’re in the database, and they can pressue these people to leave their neighborhoods, to even further protect their children. Nice thought, but completely not the reality of child abuse. Most is suffered at the hands of family, relatives and friends with access to a child, not released offenders committing another crime.

Megan’s has been in effect for years now, and the on-line offender registries have been available for awhile as well. If it’s as effective as proponents said it would be, shouldn’t we see a corresponding decline in the number of child sexual cases being reported? Do we?

  1. Emily
    | Reply

    Hi Mike

    I have strong feelings about this. I wrote a post on the subject that I think you read before http://www.doingitallagain.com/2006/07/10/2440-paedophile-sentencing-and-mr-x/

    In the comments I say:
    I am also against a sex offenders register (NOTE: I meant public register here). I really think, from knowing what I know in my case, that it would drive people underground and make them harder to monitor. Mr X is happy to be monitored as his past is secret.

    Also, for girls at least, most sexual abuse is conducted by a family member or a close friend of the family. Someone you wouldn’t suspect and doesn’t fit the brown overcoat, slits through newspaper weirdo on a park bench that we see in countless cop shows. In my case, Mr X was a likeable, even loveable, friendly, warm-hearted man that got on with everybody and who (most) children loved to play around. I can’t see how a (NOTE: I meant public) list would have identified him.

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