The Truth About Trafficking From A 20-year Veteran of the Child Exploitation Task Force

The Truth About Trafficking From A 20-year Veteran of the Child Exploitation Task Force

I think she’s right about that last point. I’ve written many times about the stories I hear, over and over again, where people don’t want to hear about child abuse and sexual abuse. It’s too sad and dirty. It isn’t very pleasant. People don’t want to know about how much sex trafficking goes on right around us every day and the hard work we could do to solve the problem. They’d rather believe conspiracy theories and look to their “heroes,” who are nothing but con artists, to fix it for them by going on rescue missions or attacking the “elites” who are supposedly controlling all sex trafficking around the world. That seems simpler than solving the problems that make kids vulnerable to trafficking: poverty, abuse, racism, a lack of support for kids transitioning out of foster care, or LGBTQ kids whom their own families do not accept.

Those are real problems that create vulnerable kids who go on to become real victims. Fixing them will require hard work and resources from all of us.

Sharing – New study shows the top healthcare issue in rural America is mental health and addiction
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Sharing – New study shows the top healthcare issue in rural America is mental health and addiction

There have been some efforts to make health care more accessible in rural areas, but I’m not sure that we’ve done nearly as much when it comes to mental health and addiction treatment. I’ve read too many stories of people needing to travel 100 miles or more to see a therapist, or get a prescription for medication, let alone finding a rehab clinic with an opening. Throw in a system that too often forgets that they exist, or uses them as pawns in power grabs instead of trying to meet the needs of these communities, and it’s no wonder that many would be feeling helpless in the face of addiction and mental health issues.

Another Tool in Abuse Prevention – Community

Another Tool in Abuse Prevention – Community

This is where the community comes in. Kids with strong connections to safe adults are less likely to be targeted and more likely to tell if they are. LGBTQ kids are less likely to struggle with suicidal ideation when they have adults who accept them as they are. Kids dealing with anxiety and depression have better outcomes when they have safe adults to talk through their emotions with, who can support them through difficult times. I’ve talked endlessly about the need for strong relationships with parents as the best preventive medicine we have for keeping children safe and supported. I’ve also talked, on my other site, about the importance of work-life balance and inclusivity when it comes to the workplace for parents. That’s what being the community that families need to succeed includes.

Reviews Elsewhere – Addiction: Notes From the Belly of the Beast

Reviews Elsewhere – Addiction: Notes From the Belly of the Beast

This brief review from Canada piqued my interest because while we tend to read a lot about addiction, one of the points of view we don’t get enough is from the addict.

From their book description, I thought it might interest the many readers who struggle with addictions themselves or know someone who is dealing with them now.

Sharing – Mental Health Professionals Really Can Assume Some Police Duties

Sharing – Mental Health Professionals Really Can Assume Some Police Duties

It’s been trialed in several areas, sending out a mental health team instead of the police to respond to certain kinds of calls. Typically calls that involve a mental health crisis, addiction, etc. What we didn’t have yet were real studies to show whether this was having the desired effect. It’s early, but this is promising: